Useful Tips When Traveling to Japan

1) Fly to Haneda not Narita International Airport

If you’re like me and Tokyo is your first stop, make sure to book your flight to land at Haneda, not Narita International Airport. Flying to Haneda will save you not only time but money as well. Narita airport is located about an hour or so away by train from central Tokyo. Although visitors can ride the Narita Express from Narita, a one-way trip costs around $30.00. Haneda airport, on the other hand, is closer to the heart of Tokyo, and visitors can reach the city center by riding the Tokyo Monorail and the JR Yamanote Line in about 25 minutes for a fraction of the price.

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Secrets of Adulthood

I’m currently reading Gretchen Rubin’s book, The Happiness Project, where she shares a list of lessons she has learned with difficulty while growing up. It’s a tad bit silly, yet contains a lot of truths.

Inspired by her list, I decided to create my own!

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10 Items I Never Travel Without

I’m incredibly fortunate to have my mom instill in me the love for travel and exploration at a very young age. I first obtained my passport when I was seven years old, and I can still remember my first experience riding an airplane was a 14-hour flight from Manila to Los Angeles. I’ve been traveling every year since, having explored nearly 31 states and 7 countries… and counting! It’s an insatiable and lifelong lust for travel that I’m happily and helplessly infected with. My passport will only retire once I take my last breath. Listed below are my top 10 travel essentials.

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Lessons as a first-time solo female traveller

After 8 months of planning, I finally completed my first solo international trip! I spent 10 days in Japan, exploring Tokyo, Osaka, Kyoto, and Nara. It’s been exactly a week since I returned home, and I’ve had enough time to digest what exactly I put myself through. Below are some tips and lessons I learned firsthand as a first time female solo traveler.

    1) Upon arrival, purchase a SIM card/on-the-go pocket WiFi

    This tip is particularly important if you do not speak the language in your intended destination. You don’t want to be completely lost and helpless in a foreign country unable to contact anyone for help. I definitely learned this lesson the hard way. Prior to my trip, I contemplated getting a pocket wifi, because I had this half noble, half delusional idea of traveling the old-fashioned way (using printed maps and asking locals). I wanted to feel like a traveler, not a tourist. My first AirBnb host, much to my surprise, lent me a pocket WiFi for free, which helped tremendously during my first three days in Tokyo. I was able to navigate through the city pretty smoothly since Google Maps was handy. It even helped me get a good grip on Tokyo’s spaghetti-like subways as well, which I learned is only intimidating at first. Once you get the system, you realize how efficient it is! It wasn’t until I had to return my pocket WiFi that I learned how much of a mistake it was not to get one for my own. Precious hours were lost with me either getting lost, not knowing how to read the signs, going in the opposite direction, or being unable to find the nearest subway/bus station. On the bright side, it forced me to hone my social skills and interact with the locals.

     2) Notable travel apps worth downloading: Google Translate, Pocket Lingo (Japanese), Ulmon: CityMaps2Go, Currency converter

    Google Translate helped a lot when asking for directions and purchasing subway and bus fares. Unfortunately, I was only able to use it during the first three days of my trip because it needed WiFi/data to function, hence Tip #1.

    Pocket Lingo (Japanese) – The app proved to be reliable, because it not only translates phrases, it also has a built-in voice system. For example, if you click the phrase, “Good morning,” it displays the words in Japanese characters, the pronunciation, and the audio of a native-speaker saying it. There were times were I felt as if someone cut my tongue off while I was in Japan. It was so difficult for me to communicate and express myself. I relied heavily on hand gestures and head nods. The language barrier was a struggle, and it was frustrating at times to be honest. Having a pocket translator app eased the strain.

    Ulmon: CityMaps2Go – I discovered Ulmon after it was suggested by one of my avid traveler friends. It’s free, and users can download maps of cities all over the world, which can be viewed even without WiFi! The app also includes a “Discover” section where users can view tips where to eat, where to go, what to do, depending on the cities they’ve downloaded.

    Currency converter – This app isn’t necessary, but it helps especially for those trying to keep track of a budget. It’s very easy to overspend abroad. I can’t recall how many almost-purchases I had, simply because I was unaware of just expensive they were. ¥4800 for  basic a camera strap, anyone?

    3) It’s perfectly okay to stay at hostels!

    I knew Japan was going to be an expensive country in general, so I tried my best to cut costs. The easiest way I did so was staying at hostels. I have multiple avid travelers in my circle of friends, and staying at hostels was a recommendation across the board. It was my first time traveling solo in a foreign country, so I had my hesitations, but I bit the bullet anyway.After doing my research on HostelWorld and TripAdvisor, I booked a total of 5 nights at J-Hoppers Hostels (2 in Osaka, 3 in Kyoto). My experience in both hostels were exceptional. Not once did I feel like I was “roughin’ it.” I stayed in a female dormitory room in Osaka (bunk beds). Two nights cost me around $46. In Kyoto, I opted for a single room, which surprisingly was traditional Japanese style with tatami mats, and the total was $97 for three nights. Both locations were clean, comfortable, conveniently located to a local subway station, and had the most welcoming and helpful English-speaking staff. They were also able to give tips on how to get around the city, where to eat the best food, etc. Staying at hostels is also a great opportunity to meet fellow travelers/potentially life-long friends!

    4) Bring cash, both your destination’s local currency and US dollars (or your country’s currency)

    I carried ¥58,000 and $200 in cash when I arrived in Japan as well as a credit card with no foreign transaction fees. I decided to bring American dollars, just in case of an emergency (which I had — a shopping emergency). I didn’t have enough Japanese yens, and the vendor didn’t accept credit cards. Thankfully, there was a foreign exchange currency nearby, and I was able to exchange my American dollars with no hassle since I didn’t need to track down an ATM machine, which I’m positive would demand an additional fee as well to use.

    5) Learn basic phrases

    I hope this is self-explanatory. Remember: you are the foreigner. Please do not be arrogant enough to expect the locals to accommodate to you and cater to your needs and comfort level. You’re in their homeland.The top phrases I used during my trip was “Sumimasen” (excuse me), “Arigato gozaimasu” (thank you), and “ikura desu ka?” (how much?).

    6) Make copies of important documents

    Make copies of your passport, flight itineraries, lodging reservations, and Driver’s License/ID card, just in case a secondary form of identification is needed.

    7) Pack light. Pack light. Pack light!

    For my 24th birthday, I went to New York City with my best girlfriends. I brought a 50lbs rolling luggage AND a 15lbs carry-on. It not only drained me physically (our hotel didn’t have an elevator, and our room was on the fourth floor) but emotionally as well. I vowed never to repeat the same mistake again. For my trip to Japan, I challenged myself to pack light, so I invested in a pack, REI Crestrail 65, and it definitely paid off. As soon as I landed in Narita International Airport, I was greeted by stairs and stairs and more stairs. My pack was bulky, yes, but I didn’t haul ass just to carry it. Another perk was I didn’t have to waste time worrying about what to wear. I brought 3 pairs of pants, 1 heavy jacket, 2 pairs of shoes, 5 pairs of sweaters, 2 scarves, all of which I was able to mix and match. It was liberating not wasting hours contemplating something so trivial such as outfits.

Thank you for reading! Feel free to leave comments and ask questions! Stay tuned for more!

Cheers,
Anicka “cue post vacation withdrawals” Nadine

A few things I’m grateful for…

Processed with VSCOcam with a6 preset1) Living in Los Angeles

It’s a love-hate relationship. Love for all the options/activities/food/culture it offers. Hate for all the traffic/smog and ten million complicated parking signs. Nevertheless, I really am spoiled for having such a great city as my playground.

2) Temporary people

As cliché as it sounds, people do come in and out of our lives. This year, I cut ties with numerous people. Some were easier to let go than others. Life is too short, and I’ve learned that there’s no point in tolerating toxic and unhealthy relationships with people who no longer contribute to my growth.

If my gut says they’re bad news, I have to act on that gut feeling (and not question that gut feeling — which is still a work in progress) and let them go. My instincts have been the primary decision-maker as to who stays and who goes, and so far, it’s been 100% accurate.

3) Lifers

Along the lines of what I mentioned above, I am incredibly grateful for my lifers. My family, first and foremost, and my small group of close girlfriends who I’ve known for practically half of my life. I’m blessed to have a strong support system.

On the other side of meeting temporary people these past few months, I am grateful for the new relationships I’ve started with the very few special individuals who I have a very good feeling would be lifers.

4) Getting past the stage of super self-consciousness

My body is by no means perfect, and there are A LOT of things I wish I change about it if I could. Very gradually, I’ve learned to accept that there is nothing I can do about my short legs/thunder thighs and that I will never reach my dream height of 5’7″.

I used to obsess over my scars and stretch marks, and I still have days where I struggle to love my “stripes,” but it’s liberating to accept yourself for who you are.

5) Shit that happens

It helps us grow and appreciate the good. We learn to distinguish between the petty nuisances from what really matters.

6) The possibility of love

One of my biggest fears after my devastating breakup with my ex was not being able to find someone who I can connect with the same level I connected with my ex. I didn’t believe that lightning can strike the same place twice, yet the universe is currently in the process of proving me wrong.

I practically met my dream man. He’s kind, driven, compassionate, gentle, appreciative, and he does everything with intention and purpose. He loves food and travel and adventure… He is the perfect combination of all the attributes I am looking for in a man, which I thought was unrealistic until he came along. He’s such a rare occurrence, like a needle I somehow found in a haystack.

I see a lot of myself in him, and we have shared moments that are so perfect that I still have trouble accepting that he is real. How can a guy like him exist?  And more mind-blowingly, he likes me too?

I don’t know how things will unfold down the road with him, but I’m going to let the chips fall where they may. Love is perhaps the only thing in the world that I will have blind faith on, but I am doing it. I’m trusting the process. I’m trusting what’s next.

What are you grateful for?

Love,
Anicka Nadine