Lessons as a first-time solo female traveller

After 8 months of planning, I finally completed my first solo international trip! I spent 10 days in Japan, exploring Tokyo, Osaka, Kyoto, and Nara. It’s been exactly a week since I returned home, and I’ve had enough time to digest what exactly I put myself through. Below are some tips and lessons I learned firsthand as a first time female solo traveler.

    1) Upon arrival, purchase a SIM card/on-the-go pocket WiFi

    This tip is particularly important if you do not speak the language in your intended destination. You don’t want to be completely lost and helpless in a foreign country unable to contact anyone for help. I definitely learned this lesson the hard way. Prior to my trip, I contemplated getting a pocket wifi, because I had this half noble, half delusional idea of traveling the old-fashioned way (using printed maps and asking locals). I wanted to feel like a traveler, not a tourist. My first AirBnb host, much to my surprise, lent me a pocket WiFi for free, which helped tremendously during my first three days in Tokyo. I was able to navigate through the city pretty smoothly since Google Maps was handy. It even helped me get a good grip on Tokyo’s spaghetti-like subways as well, which I learned is only intimidating at first. Once you get the system, you realize how efficient it is! It wasn’t until I had to return my pocket WiFi that I learned how much of a mistake it was not to get one for my own. Precious hours were lost with me either getting lost, not knowing how to read the signs, going in the opposite direction, or being unable to find the nearest subway/bus station. On the bright side, it forced me to hone my social skills and interact with the locals.

     2) Notable travel apps worth downloading: Google Translate, Pocket Lingo (Japanese), Ulmon: CityMaps2Go, Currency converter

    Google Translate helped a lot when asking for directions and purchasing subway and bus fares. Unfortunately, I was only able to use it during the first three days of my trip because it needed WiFi/data to function, hence Tip #1.

    Pocket Lingo (Japanese) – The app proved to be reliable, because it not only translates phrases, it also has a built-in voice system. For example, if you click the phrase, “Good morning,” it displays the words in Japanese characters, the pronunciation, and the audio of a native-speaker saying it. There were times were I felt as if someone cut my tongue off while I was in Japan. It was so difficult for me to communicate and express myself. I relied heavily on hand gestures and head nods. The language barrier was a struggle, and it was frustrating at times to be honest. Having a pocket translator app eased the strain.

    Ulmon: CityMaps2Go – I discovered Ulmon after it was suggested by one of my avid traveler friends. It’s free, and users can download maps of cities all over the world, which can be viewed even without WiFi! The app also includes a “Discover” section where users can view tips where to eat, where to go, what to do, depending on the cities they’ve downloaded.

    Currency converter – This app isn’t necessary, but it helps especially for those trying to keep track of a budget. It’s very easy to overspend abroad. I can’t recall how many almost-purchases I had, simply because I was unaware of just expensive they were. ¥4800 for  basic a camera strap, anyone?

    3) It’s perfectly okay to stay at hostels!

    I knew Japan was going to be an expensive country in general, so I tried my best to cut costs. The easiest way I did so was staying at hostels. I have multiple avid travelers in my circle of friends, and staying at hostels was a recommendation across the board. It was my first time traveling solo in a foreign country, so I had my hesitations, but I bit the bullet anyway.After doing my research on HostelWorld and TripAdvisor, I booked a total of 5 nights at J-Hoppers Hostels (2 in Osaka, 3 in Kyoto). My experience in both hostels were exceptional. Not once did I feel like I was “roughin’ it.” I stayed in a female dormitory room in Osaka (bunk beds). Two nights cost me around $46. In Kyoto, I opted for a single room, which surprisingly was traditional Japanese style with tatami mats, and the total was $97 for three nights. Both locations were clean, comfortable, conveniently located to a local subway station, and had the most welcoming and helpful English-speaking staff. They were also able to give tips on how to get around the city, where to eat the best food, etc. Staying at hostels is also a great opportunity to meet fellow travelers/potentially life-long friends!

    4) Bring cash, both your destination’s local currency and US dollars (or your country’s currency)

    I carried ¥58,000 and $200 in cash when I arrived in Japan as well as a credit card with no foreign transaction fees. I decided to bring American dollars, just in case of an emergency (which I had — a shopping emergency). I didn’t have enough Japanese yens, and the vendor didn’t accept credit cards. Thankfully, there was a foreign exchange currency nearby, and I was able to exchange my American dollars with no hassle since I didn’t need to track down an ATM machine, which I’m positive would demand an additional fee as well to use.

    5) Learn basic phrases

    I hope this is self-explanatory. Remember: you are the foreigner. Please do not be arrogant enough to expect the locals to accommodate to you and cater to your needs and comfort level. You’re in their homeland.The top phrases I used during my trip was “Sumimasen” (excuse me), “Arigato gozaimasu” (thank you), and “ikura desu ka?” (how much?).

    6) Make copies of important documents

    Make copies of your passport, flight itineraries, lodging reservations, and Driver’s License/ID card, just in case a secondary form of identification is needed.

    7) Pack light. Pack light. Pack light!

    For my 24th birthday, I went to New York City with my best girlfriends. I brought a 50lbs rolling luggage AND a 15lbs carry-on. It not only drained me physically (our hotel didn’t have an elevator, and our room was on the fourth floor) but emotionally as well. I vowed never to repeat the same mistake again. For my trip to Japan, I challenged myself to pack light, so I invested in a pack, REI Crestrail 65, and it definitely paid off. As soon as I landed in Narita International Airport, I was greeted by stairs and stairs and more stairs. My pack was bulky, yes, but I didn’t haul ass just to carry it. Another perk was I didn’t have to waste time worrying about what to wear. I brought 3 pairs of pants, 1 heavy jacket, 2 pairs of shoes, 5 pairs of sweaters, 2 scarves, all of which I was able to mix and match. It was liberating not wasting hours contemplating something so trivial such as outfits.

Thank you for reading! Feel free to leave comments and ask questions! Stay tuned for more!

Cheers,
Anicka “cue post vacation withdrawals” Nadine

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My Top 10 Road Trip Tips

Everyone should experience a classic all-American road trip. The open road, the ever-changing scenery, the unexpected stalls at the side of the road, the possibility of having an epic experience right around the corner are just a few things that give road trips their unquestionable and eternal lure. With less than a month left until I embark on another adventure from Los Angeles to Chicago, I would like to share a few helpful tips I’ve learned throughout the years as a road trip enthusiast having traveled to over 23 states.

  1. Create a realistic itinerary

    Planning is definitely the first basic step in preparing for a road trip. Select a destination(s), research attractions, and create an itinerary that outlines how many days you have for travel and where you want to go. Make sure your itinerary is realistic and not overly ambitious. Driving 15 hours straight to cover “x” many states may seem doable on paper, but avoid overestimating your energy level when it’s time to put theory into practice.

  2. Do NOT make hotel reservations in advance

    Unless traveling during the busy peak season, making hotel reservations in advance is something I don’t advice. Although it is essential to have some sort of planning done, I also want to reiterate the importance of being loose and flexible! Delays such road blocks, flat tires, getting lost (yes, even with a GPS!) can happen unexpectedly when it comes to road trips. Last year, I traveled with my family all over the Northeastern Seaboard for two weeks. Not having made lodging accommodations in advance, we eliminated the unnecessary stress of constantly chasing time and worrying about being in a certain place at a certain day. I remember spending half of that trip literally sleeping in a different state from the night before. Pretty darn cool.

  3. Have a hardcopy map along with a GPS

    Even the latest newest GPS devices can malfunction, so bring a hardcopy map as backup.

  4. Have your vehicle thoroughly serviced

    Check the tires, air pressure, fluids, brakes, wiper blades, belts, hoses, horn, headlights… and so on! Having a safe reliable car is the easiest way to ensure a pleasant car ride.

  5. Pack smart

    My rule of thumb is to pack with the mentality as if you’re traveling by air. At best, stick to one carry-on sized luggage. To maximize mixing and matching opportunities, bring neutral clothes with pops of color. Also, make sure to leave extra room in your luggage for travel souvenirs. Watch this Youtube video to learn how to pack like a pro!

  6. Check the weather beforehand

    I learned this the hard way. My most recent road trip was a brief 4-day excursion from Los Angeles to Big Sur to Lake Tahoe this past April. Thinking that it’s Spring, my brain somehow assumed that the weather in ALL of California would be comfortable, where it would be warm during the day while cool at night. Boy, was I mistaken. It was downright snowing at Lake Tahoe (think 12 inches!), and I did not pack a single item of clothing built for snow. Cue emergency shopping for snow shoes! Unplanned spending, even for shoes, is never fun especially when you know that your perfectly good pair of SOREL boots are sitting unused at home.

  7. Pack a cooler with nutritious foods and snacks

    With miles and miles of open road, eateries that offer healthy and nutritious foods are few and far in between. To prevent gaining weight while traveling and resisting the temptations of fast food, pack a cooler with cool water and healthy snacks such as fresh berries, apple slices, baby carrots and celeries with hummus for dipping!

  8. Be prepared

    A lot of things can go wrong when out on the road, especially for long distance driving. Stock your car with basics like water, snacks, medication, flashlights, sharp knives, and a first aid kit. Click here for a list of additional items to bring for roadside emergencies.

  9. Stay amused

    With hours and hours on the road ahead, it’s important to keep oneself entertained. I suggest creating a mixed CD/playlist or loading up your iPod/MP3 player with songs. Don’t forget to bring all the essential power cords and chargers while you’re at it! Another way to stay amused would be to have “road trip games.” During a mini-road trip from North Carolina to Virginia last year, my travel buddy and I invented a game where we would try to come up with as many names as we can about a particular category. The only rule is to name a thing/person/place whose name starts with the same letter as the last of the one before. For example, under the Fictional Characters category, one person can start with “Spongebob,” and it can be followed by “Bon Qui Qui,” which then can be proceeded by “Indiana Jones.”

  10. Relax!

    You’re on vacation! Enjoy every minute!

Feel free to share YOUR road trip travel tips in the comments section!

Xx,
Anicka Nadine